18k rose gold Calibre de Cartier diver Chronograph Watch Replica Online Review

The Calibre de Cartier Diver Chronograph Replica may be the latest number of Cartier, released in 2013. This can be a brand new watch series. New timing wrist collocation completely independent manufacturing 1904 – CH MC type machine, outfitted with vertical on-off device. Collocation is 42 mm watchcase round stainless steel or gold, stainless steel/gold strap or leather strap. And we’ll evaluate the Calibre de Cartier Chronograph replica watches 1 by 1 at after couple of days.

Cartier Calibre de Cartier Diver Watch Replica

Calibre DE Cartier Chronograph watch of wrist of timing by Cartier acclaimed watch manufacturing company Carole Forestier – Kasapi introduced, she’s the champion from the 2012 Geneva watch is excellent reward best watch manufacturing company award. The movements have double boxes. Additionally, Cartier choose integrated linear zero hammer in new machine core, to make sure that lightly press the button, all timing pointer came back in tangible-time, synchronous and accurate in position.

18k rose gold case, 18 k rose gold minutes rail table, heptagon crown, enchase a cut surface cutting sapphire, blue sapphire crystal mirror surface. Silver pearl dial, volute decorative around the time scale circle, rose gold face chamfer, luminous sword shape black stainless steel needle. Semi matte brown alligator strap, 18 k rose gold folding clasp. Cartier 1904 – CH chain on MC type automatic mechanical movement, timing clock, calendar display window 6 positions. Waterproof depth of 100 meters.

The wonder and glamour from the Cartier replica watches may not stick out very easily to enchant every lady of excellent taste and charming personality. But adorned using the sparkles of silver and also the classic feels of brown, this watch highlights its very own antique-styled enthrallment, rather feminine and stylish. Perfectly mixing art with function, it’s a fashionable accessory for compliment ladies’ beauty.

Of the easily round dial that’s layed out with a silver-well developed bezel, the cartier calibre replica Watch habours a higher-performance movement paid by a strong case. Made in solid 316 stainless steel, the case is equally as sleek because the bezel. Additionally, the best replica watch dial is extremely legible and readable due to distinct black Roman numeral markers, two sword-like hour and minute hands along with a slim black second hand adopted.

Fitted with a date indicator at 3 o’clock position, the watch dial is unquestionably better and functional. Simple as possible, the dial presents its delicacy beautifully and stylishly. To include a specific touch of classic for this contemporary, a top quality genuine leather strap is simply colored in brown, clearly not the same as the stands out from the case the wholesomeness from the dial.

Like a mineral crystal scratch durable glass face can be used to provide better protection for that water proofing, this watch is definitely of excellence and gratifaction under different situations. Keep the eyes stare only at that Calibre de Cartier Replica Watch and you’ll understand everything of the watch is simply born for that perfection of womanliness.

Replica Buying Guide Harry Winston to Unveil the Long Awaited Opus 14 in October 2015

Third, the incorporation of an automatic movement with an updated balance spring is something that I feel also shows the brand’s devotion to time precision as a real jeweler-watchmaker, not just a jeweler who happens to create a couple fancy watches. Harry Winston – hugely successful as a celebrity favorite for their spectacular one-of-a-kind diamond inventions and, only afterwards, equally-as-elegant women’s and men’s watches – could have easily lasted to make simple quartz diamond-encrusted jewelry-watches and always found customers.Even though plume and flight-inspired watches are on the scene in a major way since about 2013, they’ve become increasingly more evolved in their own interpretations. The most famous are, needless to say, Dior and their Grand Bal Plume, which ingeniously designed the feathered element into the rotor component to increase beauty in motion; Cartier’s Marquetry Parrot, that imagined a feathered design but crafted rather from individually fashioned flower petal pieces; and Graff’s iconic butterfly view, showcasing 1,641 diamonds blended with 108 multicolored sapphires at a kaleidoscope of shifting colors. Each piece highlights a distinct new design technique.In the Harry Winston Premier Precious Butterfly collection, the case is made from either 18K white gold or rose gold with 2.32ct across 57 brilliant-cut white diamonds at a frame pattern adorning the bezel. The matching buckle is also set with diamonds, tonal 18K gold, and a dramatic black satin strap.

Harry Winston is set to continue the landmark series of complications with the introduction of the much anticipated Opus 14 at the end of October 2015.

After a one year hiatus – the Opus XIII was introduced in 2013 – the Opus 14, or perhaps Opus XIV, will make its debut at the end of October this year, according to an announcement by Harry Winston. That puts to rest rumours that the series had met its end. Nothing has yet been revealed about the Opus 14, especially if it’s developed in-house or in collaboration with an independent watchmaker as is tradition. First conceived by Maximilian Büsser of MB&F while he was chief executive of Harry Winston Rare Timepieces, the Opus is a landmark series of watches. Originally an annual edition, each created with an independent watchmaker and boasting a totally original way of showing the time, the Opus made Harry Winston the jeweller a respected watchmaker. Now owned by the Swatch Group, Harry Winston is entangled in a dispute with Ludovic Ballouard, the independent watchmaker who created the Opus XIII (Ballouard’s statement in French), delaying its delivery. With the delivery of the Opus 12 from 2012 also lagging, the Opus 14 has to deliver, both figuratively and literally. 

Replica Trusted Dealers Introducing the Harry Winston Ocean Dual Time Retrograde Only Watch, a Unique Travel Time for Charity

The Histoire de Tourbillon series will get Harry Winston in trouble. Seeing how every iteration of the series of incredible heritage watches is becoming exponentially more and more complex every year, we are starting to wonder how on Earth will they manage to deliver something which may up the ante from the previous version. Nonetheless, it does not seem like 2016 will be the year that the Histoire De Tourbillon plateaued, with the debut of the downright galactic Harry Winston Histoire de Tourbillon 7 for Baselworld.So how, exactly, does one go on topping 2015’s eye-watering, $600,000 Tourbillon 6, which marveled with nearly 700 parts, two time indicators, an 80-hour power reserve, and a tri-axial tourbillon — all housed in a titanic 55mm case? Easy. You double down with none, but two bi-axial tourbillons wed with a spherical String that averages their behavioural patterns relative to position and gravity to give a stunning, synchronous ballet with time. Easy, right?On newspaper, the HW4502 movement may appear simpler, as it is comprised of only a hair over 500 parts and 84 stone. Plus, this latest version does not contain quite as many unique complications since the Tourbillon 6. Additionally, it’s still about precisely the same size as the (above-average-sized) modern wristwatch, at 43.5 millimeter wide and 8.65 millimeter thick — and again, those are the dimensions of just the movement independently! Anyhow, that notable decrease in component count appears to have enabled the Harry Winston Histoire de Tourbillon 7’s movement engineers to focus on the technical wizardry behind carrying one tourbillon complication with two axes of diverse trajectories that push the escapements, and doubling it — a clinically calculated accomplishment Winston clarifies was accomplished with “outstanding technical intensity.” Sounds about Perfect.

Harry Winston has created a unique version of the Ocean Dual Time Retrograde in white gold with blue and red livery for Only Watch 2015.

Decorated in a flurry of red, black and blue, the one of a kind Ocean Dual Time Retrograde is Harry Winston‘s entry for charity auction Only Watch. It offers twin time zones, local time on the sub-dial at one o’clock and home time on a retrograde indicator running from six to 12 o’clock.  While the regular production Ocean Dual Time Retrograde is monochromatic, this unique edition takes liberties with shapes and colours. The design is an exaggerated version of the action movie aesthetic common to the Ocean line of sports watch. A blue anodised aluminium frame sits over the sub-dial at one o’clock, looking all pointy and sharp, just like the shuriken-shaped seconds hand (a motif pioneered by Maximilian Büsser while he was head of Harry Winston Rare Timepieces and one he carried over to MB&F). The second time zone display on the left is in red and black, with the quarters highlighted in white. 

The case is white gold, with a 44.2mm diameter and the signature crown guard inspired by the arch above Harry Winston’s store in New York City. It’s powered by a Frederic Piguet base movement.

The Ocean Dual Time Retrograde will be sold on November 7, 2015 to benefit a foundation that’s searching for a cure to Duchenne muscular dystrophy. 

Replica Watches Buy Online A Detailed Look at the Harry Winston Opus 14 (Original Photos, Video & Review)

Just twenty pieces of the Harry Winston Histoire de Tourbillon 8 will be generated (ten with the red dial, and ten in anthracite grey). We do not yet have a verified price, but when the HDT 7’s $600,000 price tag was any sign, anticipate those twenty five owners to become extremely well-heeled indeed. Harry Winston’s Task Z collection has existed for over a decade now, and also the famed jeweler and watch maker has recently shown off the 10th watch in the collection. Dubbed very simply the Harry Winston Project Z10 watch, this watch, like its predecessors, features the use of Zalium and can be heavily influenced by technology and architecture.If that the Harry Winston Project Z is unfamiliar to you, here’s a brief recap. The Z describes Zalium, an exclusive zirconium-based alloy developed by Ron Winston, the son of Harry Winston, who also happened to be a fairly gifted chemical engineer who did lots of work with rocket propellants.He shortly realized that the properties of zirconium were perfect for watchmaking. Not only was it extremely resistant to corrosion, it was also hypoallergenic, quite strong, and mild. Ron then produced a special zirconium alloy and named it Zalium. In 2004, the first Harry Winston Project Z watch was started and this had been the beginning of the collection.Fast forward 12 years and we’ve got the 10th watch at the group – that the Harry Winston Project Z10 watch. Like the remainder of the Project Z watches that preceded it, the Harry Winston Project Z10 watch has a case made from Zalium. The circumstance is 42.2mm wide and features a chunky design with very conspicuous crown guards. The case is also filled with details, which is impressive considering how hard it’s to work with Zalium due to its hardness. The Harry Winston Project Z10 view is also water resistant to 100 meters, which is fitting for its sporty design.

A long awaited continuation of the most legendary series of watches in independent watchmaking, the Harry Winston Opus 14 has just made its debut. Here’s what we think of it.

The latest instalment in the landmark series of complicated wristwatches, the Harry Winston Opus 14 has a lot to live up to. Conceived by the watchmakers Johnny Girardin and Franck Orny, and then brought to fruition by the engineering prowess of the Harry Winston’s parent the Swatch Group, the Opus 14 is a miniature automaton inspired by a jukebox, powered by a movement made up of over 1000 components. And in a departure from the grand tradition of the Opus series, it was complete and ready for sale the day of its launch.  Origins of the Opus The Opus series was conceived by Maximilian Büsser, who later went on to found MB&F, in the early 2000s, as a way to give independent watchmakers more exposure while boosting the watchmaking credentials of the New York jeweller. Then the recently minted chief executive of Harry Winston Rare Timepieces, Büsser chose to work with François-Paul Journe for the first Opus, resulting in unique 18 wristwatches. That set the tone for the rest of the Opus series, which became an annual collaboration between a noted independent watchmaker and Harry Winston. That premise was reflected in its name, inspired by Opus One, the California winery founded by the Chateau Mouton Rothschild and Robert Mondavi. Some of the best and brightest minds in contemporary watchmaking have been responsible for Opus timepieces. Some like Journe, but also Felix Baumgartner of Urwerk, the duo behind Greubel Forsey, and Vianney Halter, are well known. Others, like Jean-Marc Wiederrecht of complications specialist Agenhor, are less famous outside the industry but no less talented. An inherited and intriguing idea  When the Swatch Group acquired Harry Winston in 2013, many observers cast doubt on the future of the Opus series, especially given the dispute between Opus 13 creator Ludovic Ballouard and the Swatch Group over payment and ownership. But the concept of the Opus 14 already existed before the takeover, and Harry Winston’s new owners inherited it.  Devised by Johnny Girardin and Franck Orny (founders of the boutique firm Telos Watch), the idea was modelled on a jukebox with its stack of vinyl records and an arm to carry the record to the turntable.  “[We] like concepts related to daily life,” explained Orny, adding that their desire was to create a complication the wearer can interact with.

From left: Johnny Girardin, Franck Orny, Nayla Hayek and Marc Hayek

Girardin and Orny are not new to such complications, having been responsible for the Montblanc Timewriter Metamorphosis wristwatch. That featured a transforming dial that would part in the middle to reveal another dial beneath. Fascinating as it was, the Metamorphosis took several years to come to market due to the complexity of the mechanisms. Harry Winston, on the other hand, has the good fortune to be part of the Swatch Group, which along with Rolex is the only wholly vertically integrated watchmaking entity in Switzerland. The Swatch Group’s mastery of engineering and watchmaking is practically peerless. With a little help from my friends Harry Winston had a leg up with the development of the Opus largely thanks to Blancpain and Breguet, the two haute horlogerie watchmakers owned by the Swatch Group. Notably, each brand has its own movement factory, Blancpain with Frederic Piguet and Breguet with Nouvelle Lemania, though both factories have now been merged into the watch brands. 

The Opus 14 on Marc Hayek, chief of Blancpain, Breguet and Jaquet Droz

Both Blancpain and Breguet aided with the development of the Opus 14, and more importantly, with its testing. While developing the movement took 18 months, testing it took just as long, a process that included automated activation of the jukebox system 4500 times. That’s equivalent of 30 months of daily wear of the Opus 14 and using the jukebox mechanism five times each day.  Consequently, the Opus 14 is only the second watch in the series (after the Opus 5 of 2005), to be working and ready for sale on the date of its launch. To paraphrase Oscar Wilde, most Opus watches were a triumph of hope over experience. The Opus 3 took more than a decade to reach the consumer, and there are past Opus watches that remain a fantasy years after their introduction, the Opus 8 and 11 being two famous examples. These never made it into commercial production because the movements are either too complex or too unreliable to produce in series. What it does In the tradition of the series (hence all the undelivered, prior watches), the Opus 14 performs simple functions in an incredibly complex manner – the movement is comprised of 1066 parts. By comparison, the most complicated Patek Philippe wristwatch ever made, the Grand Master Chime, has a 1366-part movement, while Lange’s title holder has 876 components in its movement. Mechanically the Opus 14 is up to scratch when compared against its predecessors. 

The simplest function on the Opus 14 is the local time (despite the “Home Time” label on it in the pictures), shown on a disc inside the raised sapphire cylinder at nine o’clock. Indicating the time where the wearer is, it is read in conjunction with the retrograde minutes on the red and silver scale that runs from three to six o’clock.

Beyond that, it gets complicated. Beneath the local time disc are three additional discs, modelled on vinyl records of course. They are stacked up underneath the home time disc, as LPs would be in a jukebox. A slide on the side of the case at nine o’clock selects the function required. Once selected, pressing the button in the case at four o’clock causes a tiny arm to grab the appropriate disc, pull it out and place it on the turntable-like platform at two o’clock. The movement of the arm generates a noticeable buzz because its motion is regulated by an anchor governor (similar to that found in old minute repeating pocket watches). This was done on purpose, because its designers wanted the mechanism to sound like a jukebox. 

The sapphire crystal on the front is impressively large and domed; and it’s a single piece, including the cylinder for the discs

Three discs can be put on the turntable. The first is a stationary display depicting a blue star as well as the signature of Harry Winston himself; this has no function and is merely for decoration. The second disc shows another time zone on a 12-hour scale, similar to the local time disc at nine o’clock. And the third disc is for the date display. Because the discs are static and unconnected with the movement while in storage, the turntable then spins the disc to show the correct information. So the movement has to know what time or date it is, and then rotate the disc to the appropriate position. While the disc is out, it turns continuously, keeping the time. Pressing the button puts the disc back in the stack, via the same arm. All of this takes 8 to 8.5 seconds, five to bring the disc out and turn it to the correct position, and another three to return it. Two pushers in the case at 12 o’clock, both helpfully labelled, are to set the date and second time zone display. All of that motion requires tremendous power, which is why the movement has two mainsprings, one to keep the time and the other to power the jukebox mechanism; this double barrel set-up was based on similarly constructed Blancpain movements. Turning the crown winds both barrels simultaneously; on a full wind the movement will run for 68 hours, with up to five back and forth disc changes.

Actual Americana? The Opus 14 is meant to be inspired by America, specifically 1950s America – jukeboxes, Cadillacs with tailfins and Happy Days. That explains the red, blue and white colour scheme, a logo shaped like U.S. Route shield, the star inspired by the Hollywood Walk of Fame. But the result looks more like a Swiss person’s (or specifically a Vallee de Joux resident’s) vision of American pop culture, rather than convincing Americana.

At 54.7mm in diameter and just under 22mm high, the Opus 14 is a monumental watch. Some of the other watches in the Opus series have been as bulky, and its short lugs help the fit on the wrist. But it is still exceptionally large, though not exceptionally heavy it has to be said, which makes it easier to wear. The future Because the jukebox-like mechanism is versatile – the discs can be made to display anything – and limited only by the size of the movement, it might make its way into other timepieces. While affirming the special place of the Opus in the company’s offerings, Marc Hayek did concede during the launch “ideas or principles [found in the Opus 14 movement] might be reused in other brands, but not replicated”. More intriguingly, Hayek also added, “This [jukebox mechanism] could do music.” The Opus series will continue, added Hayek, though not as an annual series. Each new Opus will be unveiled when it is ready for sale, most likely every 12 to 24 months, said Hayek.

Pricing and availability  The Opus 14 is limited to 50 pieces in white gold. It’s priced at SFr428,000 or €410,000, with a small number of watches available this year. The rest will be delivered progressively till 2017.

Replica Watches Essentials Watchonista’s dedicated Harry Winston Opus page

Third, the incorporation of an automatic movement with an updated balance spring is something that I feel also shows the brand’s devotion to time precision because a actual jeweler-watchmaker, not only a jeweler who happens to make a couple fancy watches. Harry Winston – hugely successful as a star favorite because of their stunning one-of-a-kind gemstone inventions and, only afterwards, equally-as-elegant women’s and men’s watches – might have easily lasted to create easy quartz diamond-encrusted jewelry-watches and always found customers.Even though plume along with flight-inspired watches have been around the scene in a significant way since about 2013, they’ve become increasingly more evolved in their interpretations. The most well-known are, of course, Dior and their Grand Bal Plume, which ingeniously made the feathered element to the rotor component to enhance beauty in motion; Cartier’s Marquetry Parrot, that imagined a feathered layout but crafted instead from individually fashioned flower petal pieces; and Graff’s iconic butterfly watch, showcasing 1,641 diamonds combined with 108 multicolored sapphires in a kaleidoscope of shifting colours. Each piece highlights a different new design technique.In the Harry Winston Premier Precious Butterfly collection, the situation is made from either 18K white gold or rose gold with 2.32ct across 57 brilliant-cut white diamonds in a frame pattern adorning the bezel. The matching buckle is also set with diamonds, tonal 18K gold, and a dramatic black lace strap.



Harry Winston Opus 11 by Denis Giguet

Swiss watch portal Watchonista has put up a page dedicated to the Harry Winston Opus collection, containing information on all 11 Opus watches to date. Very soon Opus 12 will be revealed at Baselworld. Stay tuned.

– SJX

Replica Buying Guide Harry Winston Introduces the Opus 14, Featuring a Jukebox Automaton Complication (with Pricing)

The two biaxial tourbillons each comprise 117 parts and each weigh 0.76 g — which is… wait for this… a mind-boggling 0.0065 gram average weight per component in those “whirlwinds.” The equilibrium wheels within the tourbillons are likely at 30 degrees (read more about why that matters in this epic hands of this Greubel Forsey Dual Balancier) and therefore are ticking away in a relatively hectic 3 Hertz or 21,600 beats per hour. Biaxial means two axes of rotation, and that, subsequently, usually means two distinct timings. The situation is just the same in the case of the Harry Winston Histoire de Tourbillon 7 either, as the interior cages of this tourbillons create a full rotation in 45 minutes, whereas the exterior pliers come around in 75 seconds, respectively. This dance lasts approximately 55 hours, when you’ll want to manually re-wind the hand-wound caliber.Focusing on the tourbillons has also simplified the dial up and made the watch overall more legible — an achievement we love just as much (if not more), as any further advancements in technical sophistication. The dial is that rectangular, gently skeletonized design in anodized aluminum, with numerals and hands which you could actually read. Given the 50.9mm diameter of the enormous, 18k white gold case, the dial must be about exactly the exact same size as you’d see on a Reverso — therefore legibility should not be a problem anymore.ou’ll also note that while the white gold case has been slimmed to a paltry ~51mm in diameter and 17.3mm in depth the lugs have also been shortened and turned down, probably in a bid to further improve wearability as well.Only twenty portions of this Harry Winston Histoire de Tourbillon 7 will probably be produced — ten in a red dial option, and ten at an anthracite version, along with the jury remains out on whether or not the cost will exceed last season’s version. Stay tuned for official pricing and impressions from our Baselworld 2016 coverage.

After a two year intermission, Harry Winston has returned to its signature Opus series with the Opus 14 that features a complication with retracting discs inspired by a jukebox.

Harry Winston‘s Opus is the landmark series of complications developed by the New York jeweller in collaboration with independent watchmakers. But the last one, the Opus XIII, was introduced in 2013, leaving doubts as to the future of the series. With the launch of the impressively complex Opus 14 those doubts have been put to rest. The Opus 14 is inspired by the jukebox and 1950s Americana, featuring a dual time complication that functions exactly like a jukebox. The concept of the Opus 14 was developed by Franck Orny and Johnny Girardin, the pair of watchmakers responsible for the Montblanc Timewriter Metamorphosis wristwatch with its unusual transforming dial. The raised cylinder at nine o’clock contains four different discs, obviously inspired by a vinyl record. Topmost is the home time disc, showing the hours in the home time zone and always visible on the top. Minutes are show on a retrograde scale at four o’clock, while the power reserve is at six o’clock. 

Sitting below the home time disc are additional discs for the second time zone, date and the last depicting the signature of brand founder Harry Winston. A function selector slide on the left flank of the case band allows the wearer to select which disc he desires on the dial. Once selected, the button at four o’clock brings the disc out.

The function selector slide

The disc is carried by an arm just like that on a record player, which picks up the selected disc and places it on the turntable-like platform located at two o’clock. Once placed on the platform, the disc remains until the pusher is pressed again, an action that returns the disc to the stack at nine o’clock.

The cylinder containing the discs is on the left of the movement

Though the Opus 14 has simple functions – second time zone and date – it is powered by an exceptionally complex movement. Comprised of 1066 components, the movement is has a similar part count to a grande and petit sonnerie calibre. It’s hand-wound with a 68 hour power reserve. Two mainsprings are required for its operation, one to power the timekeeping portion and the other to drive the disc display.

The Opus 14 also features a silicon hairspring, the first watch in the Opus series with a silicon component. And the movement is massive, measuring 46.7mm in diameter. As a result, the watch is enormous, with the white gold case nearly 55mm in diameter and just under 22mm high. 

The pushers in between the lugs at 12 o’clock set the second time zone and date.

Limited to just 50 pieces in white gold, the Opus 14 is priced at SFr428,000 or €410,000. 

Replica Wholesale Baselworld 2013: Harry Winston Histoire de Tourbillon 4

The two biaxial tourbillons each contain 117 parts and every weigh 0.76 grams — which is… wait for this… a mind-boggling 0.0065 gram average weight per component in these “whirlwinds.” The equilibrium wheels within the tourbillons are likely at 30 degrees (read more about why that things in this epic hands of the Greubel Forsey Dual Balancier) and are ticking away at a relatively hectic 3 Hertz or 21,600 beats per hour. The situation is no different in the case of the Harry Winston Histoire de Tourbillon 7 either, as the interior cages of this tourbillons make a complete rotation in 45 minutes, whereas the outside cages come around in 75 seconds, respectively. This dance lasts approximately 55 hours, when you’ll need to manually re-wind the hand-wound caliber.Focusing on the tourbillons has also simplified the dial up and made the watch overall more legible — an accomplishment we love just as much (or even more), as any additional advancements in technical complexity. The dial is this rectangular, gently skeletonized design in anodized aluminum, with numerals and hands that you could actually read. Given the 50.9millimeter diameter of this enormous, 18k white gold case, the dial must be on the exact same size as you would see on a Reverso — therefore legibility shouldn’t be an issue anymore.ou’ll also note that while the white gold case has been slimmed to a paltry ~51mm in diameter and 17.3mm in thickness the lugs have also been shortened and turned down, likely in a bid to further improve wearability as well.Only twenty pieces of this Harry Winston Histoire de Tourbillon 7 will be made — ten in a red dial option, and ten in an anthracite variant, along with the jury’s still out on whether or not the cost will exceed last year’s version.

Harry Winston, which was just acquired by the Swatch Group, will unveil the Histoire de Tourbillon 4 at Baselworld 2013 in April. The Histoire de Tourbillon 4 is a triple axis tourbillon – the balance wheel inside three concentric cages, each rotating at a different speed. 

The goal of all that is to average out the errors caused by gravity in all positions, not unlike what the Jaeger-LeCoultre Gyrotourbillon does, albeit with two instead of three tourbillon cages (note the visual similarities in the tourbillon cage). The first cage closest to the adjustable mass balance wheel makes one round every 45 seconds, the next cage rotates once in 75 seconds and the outermost cage takes 300 seconds to complete one revolution. Despite its complexity and size, the tourbillon weighs only 1.57 g, being mostly titanium.

All the bridges as well as the base plate of the movement are PVD coated titanium, with a frosted finish on top and polished, bevelled edges.

On the front the dial is regulator style, with the hours and minutes on separate sub-dials, along with the power reserve display at four o’clock.

Because of the spherical shape of the tourbillon, the crystal over the tourbillon is domed. And the seconds hand is also curved to follow the shape of the tourbillon carriages.

The 47 mm cushion-shaped case is white gold, while the case band, arches and lugs are in Zalium, Harry Winston’s proprietary alloy. This is a limited edition of 20 pieces. This is the fourth Histoire de Tourbillon wristwatch from Harry Winston. Its predecessor, launched last year, was a double tourbillon and was conceived and produced by Complitime, the sister company of Greubel Forsey which specialises in manufacturing complications for other brands. Neither Harry Winston nor Complitime officially acknowledge the origins of the Histoire de Tourbillon watches, but I believe this year’s Histoire de Tourbillon has a similar provenance. Interestingly, despite the shared origins with Greubel Forsey, the Histoire de Tourbillon watches have a drastically different aesthetic and finishing style compared to the magnificent timepieces of Greubel Forsey, which is likely on purpose so as to differentiate the product. Ironically that is the philosophical opposite of the Harry Winston Opus series, which is a very public collaboration between an independent watchmaker and Harry Winston. – SJX

Replica Wholesale Suppliers The first Harry Winston Opus 3 at auction

The Histoire de Tourbillon series is going to get Harry Winston in trouble. Seeing how every iteration of this set of incredible legacy watches has gotten exponentially more and more complicated every year, we’re starting to wonder how on Earth will they be able to deliver something which may up the ante in the previous version. Nonetheless, it does not seem like 2016 will be the year that the Histoire De Tourbillon plateaued, with the introduction of the downright galactic Harry Winston Histoire de Tourbillon 7 for Baselworld.So how, exactly, does one go about topping 2015’s eye-watering, $600,000 Tourbillon 6, which marveled with nearly 700 components, two time indicators, an 80-hour energy book, plus a tri-axial tourbillon — all housed in a titanic 55mm case? Easy. You double down with not one, but two bi-axial tourbillons married by a round String that averages their behavioural patterns relative to gravity and position to give a stunning, synchronous ballet with time. Easy, right?On newspaper, the HW4502 movement may appear simpler, as it is comprised of just a hair over 500 parts and 84 stone. Additionally, this newest version doesn’t contain nearly as many unique complications as the Tourbillon 6. Additionally, it’s still about precisely the exact same size as your (above-average-sized) modern wristwatch, in 43.5 millimeter wide and 8.65 millimeter thick — and again, those are the measurements of just the movement alone! Anyhow, that notable decrease in component count appears to have enabled the Harry Winston Histoire de Tourbillon 7’s movement engineers to focus on the technical wizardry behind carrying a single tourbillon complication with two axes of differing trajectories that drive the escapements, and doubling it — a clinically calculated accomplishment Winston clarifies was accomplished with “outstanding technical strength.” Sounds about right.

Harry Winston Opus 3 in rose gold

Late last year – nearly a decade after its launch in 2003 – the first few Opus 3 from Harry Winston were delivered. Conceived by Vianney Halter but far too ambitious a concept for the technology available, the Opus 3 almost became a watch of myth and legend.

A rose gold version will go under the hammer at Christie’s in Hong Kong at end May, with an estimate of US$75,000-150,000. I reckon it will go for about US$120,000 at the low end, possibly more.

Several other Opus watches, including rare diamond-set pieces, all owned by the same collector, will be offered at the same sale. The other highlights are surely the diamond pave Opus 5 by Urwerk, and the Opus 6 tourbillon by Greubel Forsey.

For those wondering if the Opus 3 has changed since its 2003 prototype, it certainly has. The watch is larger; it seems wider and thicker though the overall form is the same. Because of its bigger size, the six windows are less pronounced than in the original iteration, so the watch has lost some of its goggle-eyed look.

Despite the changed dimensions, the Opus 3 still looks distinctive and attractive. Each of the six portholes are still set deep, so the numbers are only visible when looked at straight on. And seeing the seconds jump from 57, 58, 59 to the next minute is impressive.

So many watchmakers have been consulted throughout the project in the quest to make it work, but I believe it was finally Renaud Papi that solved all the problems associated with jumping discs and torque. In the nine years since the Opus 3 was first launched, Vianney Halter has gone on to present only one new model while the other key person behind the watch, Max Busser, has gone on to create an entire brand, most recently working with Stepan Sarpaneva. Seeing the Opus 3 is really a blast from the past. – SJX

Replica Wholesale News: Swatch Group acquires Harry Winston for $750 million

Additionally, I like the modern look of the movement which, in my opinion, offers a fresh look on a high-end mechanical movement that’s contemporary in addition to approachable. Reading the time is interesting, also, since Harry Winston marries a conventional minute hand using a jumping hour index on a committed subdial in 12o’clock. A disk indicates the hours and “jumps” to the next complete numeral position each time the hour changes. The 1 legibility problem using the watch is the somewhat small red arrow which acts as the minute hand. The entire scale of moment markers as well as the five minute signs is useful, but reading the moments requires a second to locate the red arrow, meaning that it requires more than a mere glance. Possibly a small price to pay for something this intriguing on the wrist?An intriguing region of the dial which suggests that the time is that the more conventional Harry Winston “HW” emblem over the bit of black-colored sapphire crystal. It’s made to be undetectable in some light, and observable in others. I believe this move was deliberate in order to make the dial a bit more visually intriguing, forcing the wearer to move the dial around from the light to be able to appreciate it – really in a similar way that people do when looking at diamonds as they sparkle and glisten from the light.With a complicated design, the Harry Winston Ocean Tourbillon Jumping Hour is really a very straightforward view to live with given the comparatively straight forward complications along with its simplicity of use. Exotic high-end watches in this way may have unique designs but are actually pretty decent when it comes to everyday wear – and for that I’m grateful each time that I discover watches of this type. Attached to the circumstance is a fitted, tapering black alligator strap that completes the look. The three currently available versions of the Harry Winston Ocean Tourbillon Jumping Hour are a part of a limited edition of 75 pieces each. Price in 18k white or rose gold is $217,300 as well as diamonds in 18k white gold the price is $378,400.

The news has just broken that the Swatch Group has agreed to buy the watch and jewellery operations of Harry Winston for US$750 million, and will assume up to US$250 million of debt.  This only covers the watch and jewellery retail business, which includes 535 employees worldwide and the Harry Winston manufacturing facility in Geneva.  The sale does not include the mining division of the Toronto-based Harry Winston Diamond Corp, which will be renamed Dominion Diamond Corp after the sale. Dominion will then become a pure play mining concern and should eliminate some of the conglomerate discount on its shares. This is the first purchase by the Swatch Group in nearly 10 years and Harry Winston fills a hole in the Swatch Group’s portofolio. Now Swatch has a storied, high-end jewellery brand; Richemont has Cartier and Van Cleef & Arpels while LVMH has Bulgari.  Swatch has more experience running a luxury retailer than its former parent, which should help unlock some of the jeweller’s potential. But importantly, how the Swatch Group will continue or maintain Harry Winston’s Opus series and cooperation with independent watchmakers will be interesting. – SJX

Replica Wholesale Hands-on with the Harry Winston Opus 12 by Emmanuel Bouchet – a complication with 27 hands and 607 parts (with live photos, video and price)

What makes the wizardry of the Harry Winston Histoire de Tourbillon 8 so interesting, however, isn’t just that we’ve got two independently working tourbillons, both operating on two axes each, however that their mechanical performance ends in a single time measurement. To ensure the accuracy of the single measurement, the HDT 8 uses a spherical differential, which preserves an average between the two — a typical which is exhibited in the kind of the time into the right of the dial.The case of the HDT 8 itself is made of white gold, the rotating period disks from aluminum, and the tourbillon cages and motion bridges out of titanium. Dimension-wise, the Harry Winston Histoire de Tourbillon 8 carries its instance sizing over from the HDT 7, and this is by no means small: 51mm from 17mm. But bear in mind that the calibre HW4503 that homes the twin tourbillons (each of which contains 117 components alone) is 43mm by itself. Large? Yes, but at least there is a justifiably lot to check at here, even if it’s a far cry from being legible. Along with the tourbillons dancing the hours away, the dial itself is a sight to behold — comprised of one component with 13 distinct textured components. Every one of these textures is implemented through another completing procedure — from sanded, grained, and satin textures, to the complex honeycomb and engraved script layout in 12:00.

Developed together with Emmanuel Bouchet, the Harry Winston Opus 12 faithfully adheres to the governing philosophy of most the Opus series – tell the time in the most unusual and complex manner possible. 

Unveiled at last year’s Baselworld, the Opus 12 tells only the time, but is remarkably complex, and it looks the part. The fact that the Opus 12 has 27 hands is revealing. Conceptually, the Opus 12 is similar to the more recent Opus XIII, which likewise has plenty of hands and action. The movement, conceived by Emmanuel Bouchet, co-founder of movement specialist Centagora, comprises 607 parts and 80 jewels, putting it in grand complication territory.

The only conventional bits of the Opus 12 time display are the constant seconds, indicated by a blued steel hand on a sapphire ring, and the power reserve, which sits just above the seconds.

The seconds sub-dial

And then it starts to get interesting. Co-axial with the power reserve hand is the retrograde five minutes hand, meaning it jumps back to zero every five minutes and starts over.

The retrograde five minutes hand, with the power reserve just below

Arranged around the dial are 12 baton indices, which will either show blue or grey – blue meaning that’s the current time, otherwise it remains grey. The time shown on the main dial is only to the nearest five minutes, the rest of the time is indicated by the retrograde minute hand.

Each time the retrograde hand hits the five minute mark, the next five minute baton on the dial flips over to show its blue side, thus indicating the time. And the previous five minute baton simultaneously flips back to show its grey side.

The minute baton on its blue side, with the shorter hour baton visible underneath

And then there is the hour baton. This is shorter than the five minute baton, and it usually sits underneath the minute baton so it is hidden. But at the top of the hour, an elaborate process begins.

Starting at the hour that just passed, the hour batons rotate downwards and disappear. One after another, in successive order, clockwise around the dial, until the current hour is reached. For instance, as soon as the time hits three o’clock, the two o’clock baton will rotate downwards, followed by three, four, five and so on, with the three o’clock baton coming up blue at the very end. That is illustrated in this video clip:

But the hour batons don’t just turn on their own axis, instead, they rotate around the minute batons. They travel around the minute baton up to the top in order to show the time, and when the hour is past, they travel down round the other side of the minute baton to their resting place below.

This time display requires the use of bevel gears, in order to translate the horizontal gear action of the movement in the vertical motion of the hands. These bevel gears are visible at the base of the batons on the perimeter of the dial.

Most of the dial is open, revealing the gearing behind the time display. It is a compelling sight, especially when the mechanism is in action. Interestingly, Bouchet’s inspiration for the time display came from Nicolaus Copernicus’s revelation that the Earth rotates on its own axis, as well as around the Sun.

Housed inside a chunky 46 mm white gold case, the very large manual wind movement has twin barrels, but a mere 32 hour power reserve, because the constantly moving time display consumes tremendous amounts of power. The Opus 12 is impressive not just because of the time display, but the brilliant energy management which manages to keep such a complex system going.

Though the movement is visually simplistic, its two part bridges essentially form a three quarter plate, the large, screwed balance wheel is a curiously anachronistic feature which is out of place with the overall modern design.

The Opus 12 is is a limited edition of 120 pieces with a retail price of S$434,500 (~US$349,000) in Singapore, inclusive of 7% tax.

– SJX